Pickleball, more than a sport…

Beautifully written by Aspen Kern, Pickleball Forum:

I have spent nearly 12 years traveling around the country and playing Pickleball every chance I could find. I have made some realizations that I would like to share with you. Pickleball is a very unique sport for several reasons, at its core it is not about the strive for excellence, the motivation to achieve a higher rating or even about winning. For most people it is about filling a void. Having something positive to think about as we drift off to sleep at night. Seeing friends we have made and making new friends every time we play. Pickleball is about asking Nancy how her garage sale went, seeing if Fred’s surgery on his shoulder went well. Pickleball is about realizing without “you” there is no “me”. We need each other, our community thrives on friendship not medals. Sure, we like to talk about the latest paddle or that great return of serve we just hit, but what we really want is that ” connection” . The kind of connection you can only get when a group comes together under the disguise of a “sport”, a “religion” or a patriotic duty. At the end of the day Pickleball is a family, a family that is grateful for being part of a bigger thing. And an integral part of that bigger thing is a smaller thing, and that is in knowing that every time we step on the court we know someone has got our back. And that, my friend, is priceless. Yes indeed, we need each other !!

Easton Pickleball for ALL ages…

20190130_102514 (2)The Easton Pickleball Club, started in 2014, continue to have fun and enjoy great exercise 3 days a week through the winter at ForeKicks in Taunton. In this photo, former Oliver Ames girls tennis coach, Claire Planeta, teamed up this week with pickleball whiz Joseph, grandson of Marty, one of our other active players.

Stay tuned for some exciting news about improved and expanded pickleball at the Union Villa field…

If anyone wants to know more about pickleball or is interested in playing, let me know…

 

What About You? Self-Improvement and Growth Training at the Ames Free Library, Today 12/15 10:30 – 12:30 – Free and open to all…

It’s time to take control of your days and direct them to where you want them to go.

In this Self Improvement training, trained Coach Billy Giannouloudis will help you explore your mind and focus on why we do what we do. He will teach control through Goal Setting and provide tools to achieve in areas where we choose to grow.

Free and open to all.

Billy Giannouloudis is a Strategic Intervention Life Coach, a Therapeutic Mentor, as well as a Motivational Speaker. It is his goal to help people live the life they want to live and become the person they were meant to be.

Event Location:

Queset House, 2nd Floor Conference Room
51 Main St. Easton MA

Some things to ponder…

Courtesy of Lee Williams

How does Moses make tea?   Hebrews it.

 Venison for dinner again?   Oh deer!

 A cartoonist was found dead in his home.  Details are sketchy.

 I used to be a banker, but then I lost interest.

 Haunted French pancakes give me the crepes.

 England has no kidney bank, but it does have a Liverpool.

 I tried to catch some fog, but I mist.

 I thought I had type-A blood, but it was a Typo.

 I changed my iPod’s name to Titanic. It’s syncing now.

 Jokes about German sausage are the wurst.

 I know a guy who’s addicted to brake fluid, but he says he can stop any time.

 I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.

 This girl said she recognized me from the vegetarian club, but I’d never met herbivore.

 When chemists die, they barium.

 I’m reading a book about anti-gravity.  I just can’t put it down.

 I did a theatrical performance about puns.  It was a play on words.

 Why were the Indians here first?  They had reservations.

 I didn’t like my beard at first.  Then it grew on me.

 Did you hear about the cross-eyed teacher who lost her job because she couldn’t control her pupils?

 When you get a bladder infection, urine trouble.

 Broken pencils are pointless.

 What do you call a dinosaur with an extensive vocabulary?  A thesaurus.

 I dropped out of communism class because of lousy Marx.

 All the toilets in New York’s police stations have been stolen.  The police have nothing to go on.

 I got a job at a bakery because I kneaded dough.

 Velcro – what a rip off!

All about the the “Silent Generation”, those born in the 1930’s and 1940’s

I guess I just make it, I was born in 1949 but feel like a product of the 60’s. This was sent to me by Lee Williams, a friend in his 80’s…

Born in the 1930s and early 40s, we exist as a very special age cohort. We are the Silent Generation.

We are the smallest number of children born since the early 1900s. We are the “last ones”.

Born in the 1930s and early 40s, we exist as a very special age cohort. We are

We are the smallest number of children born since the early 1900s. We are the “last ones”.

We are the last generation, climbing out of the depression, who can remember the winds of war and the impact of a world at war which rattled the structure of our daily lives for years.

We are the last to remember ration books for everything from gas to sugar to shoes to stoves.

We saved tin foil and poured fat into tin cans.

We saw cars up on blocks because tires weren’t available.

We can remember milk being delivered to our house early in the morning and placed in the “milk box” on the porch.

We are the last to see the gold stars in the front windows of our grieving neighbors whose sons died in the War.

We saw the ‘boys’ home from the war build their little houses.

We are the last generation who spent childhood without television; instead, we imagined what we heard on the radio.

As we all like to brag, with no TV, we spent our childhood “playing outside”.

We did play outside, and we did play on our own.

There was no little league

There was no city playground for kids.

The lack of television in our early years meant, for most of us, that we had little real understanding of what the world was like.

On Saturday afternoons, the movies, gave us newsreels of the war sandwiched in between westerns and cartoons.

Telephones were one to a house, often shared (party lines) and hung on the wall.

Computers were called calculators, they only added and were hand cranked; typewriters were driven by pounding fingers, throwing the carriage, and changing the ribbon.

The ‘internet’ and ‘GOOGLE’ were words that did not exist.

Newspapers and magazines were written for adults and the news was broadcast on our table radio in the evening by Gabriel Heatter.

We are the last group who had to find out for ourselves.

As we grew up, the country was exploding with growth.

The G.I. Bill gave returning veterans the means to get an education and spurred colleges to grow.

VA loans fanned a housing boom.

Pent up demand coupled with new installment payment plans put factories to work.

New highways would bring jobs and mobility.

The veterans joined civic clubs and became active in politics.

The radio network expanded from 3 stations to thousands of stations.

Our parents were suddenly free from the confines of the depression and the war, and they threw themselves into exploring opportunities they had never imagined.

We weren’t neglected, but we weren’t today’s all-consuming family focus.

They were glad we played by ourselves until the street lights came on.

They were busy discovering the post war world.

We entered a world of overflowing plenty and opportunity; a world where we were welcomed.

We enjoyed a luxury; we felt secure in our future.

Depression poverty was deep rooted.

Polio was still a crippler.

The Korean War was a dark presage in the early 50s and by mid-decade school children were ducking under desks for Air-Raid training.

Russia built the “Iron Curtain” and China became Red China

Eisenhower sent the first ‘advisers’ to Vietnam.

Castro set up camp in Cuba and Khrushchev came to power.

We are the last generation to experience an interlude when there were no threats to our homeland.

We came of age in the 40s and 50s. The war was over and the cold war, terrorism, “global warming”, and perpetual economic insecurity had yet to haunt life with unease.

Only our generation can remember both a time of great war, and a time when our world was secure and full of bright promise and plenty. We have lived through both.

We grew up at the best possible time, a time when the world was getting better, not worse.

More than 99 % of us are either retired or deceased, and we feel privileged to have “lived in the best of times”!

We are the Silent Generation – “The Last Ones”

Founder of health care company shocks employees with $20 million gift before Thanksgiving

PHILADELPHIA – Workers at Bayada Home Health Care have something extra to be thankful for this year.

The company’s founder, Mark Baiada, shocked his employees Tuesday with a $20 million gift from his personal funds.

The windfall will range from $50 for new hires to tens of thousands of dollars for longtime employees, the company said…

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-news/founder-of-health-care-company-shocks-employees-with-dollar20-million-gift-before-thanksgiving/ar-BBPWVzg?ocid=NL_ENUS_A1_20181125_1_2